4 Reasons You Shouldn’t Make That Harlem Shake Easter Invite Video

1. The moment has passed, like a brown banana.

It was fun for a while and, lets face it, the Harlem Shake lasted longer and had more mainstream recognition that most internet memes do. Even the Today Show made one. That fact alone should signal the end to any notoriety or notice that your Harlem Shake might garner.

2. Converting YouTube viewers to Sunday attenders is like trying to field a football team from the luxury boxes. 

Being willing to watch something is a far cry from being willing to get in the game. YouTube and other social media outlets are great at reinforcing and building brand awareness, but person to person invitation still has the greatest impact.

3. Just like being cool in Junior High, if you THINK you are making a viral video, you most likely are not. 

Videos that take the cyber-world by storm are very much like viruses in real life, they are rarely planned, and even harder to contain. “If only we could…” thinking gets in the way of “we only should…” actions.

4. You don’t have to do what everyone else has done. 

To a lost world, the most noticeable failure of the church is the mimicry and imitation of popular culture. For centuries the church was the thermostat for artistic expression, scientific innovation and meaningful engagement, not a thermometer of cultural bandwagons.

So what can you do instead?

Try capturing at least 2 stories of people in your congregation whose lives have been impacted by your mission. Post those videos to the church Facebook wall and the church website. Instead of views, focus on shares… Call your congregation to share life change. After all, would you rather have 1 million YouTube views or 1 life changed this Easter Sunday?

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Filed under Church Life, church marketing, Outreach

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